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The United States Needs an Earthquake Warning System Already

On Monday night, residents of the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Westwood, Los Feliz, Silver Lake, and parts of the San Fernando Valley experienced a mild earthquake—a magnitude 3.6. Most people slept through the temblor and no damage was reported. But a select group of 150 LA residents got a text ...

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Emerging disease further jeopardizes North American frogs

A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. Frogs and salamanders are currently among the most threatened groups of animals on the planet. The two most ...

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How Bizarre Is This Year’s Wildfire Season, Really?

This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The West is burning, and there’s no relief in sight. More than 80 large wildfires are raging in an area covering more than 1.4 million acres, primarily in California, Montana, and Oregon, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. Taken ...

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Why Math Is the Best Way to Make Sense of the World

When Rebecca Goldin spoke to a recent class of incoming freshmen at George Mason University, she relayed a disheartening statistic: According to a recent study, 36 percent of college students don’t significantly improve in critical thinking during their four-year tenure. “These students had trouble distinguishing fact from opinion, and cause ...

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Who’s Home at the White House Science and Technology Office?

In late October 2012, as Hurricane Sandy barreled toward New York and New Jersey, barrels of information from the National Weather Service, NASA, and elsewhere inundated the White House. As the storm picked up, experts at the Office of Science and Technology Policy, or OSTP, started closely monitoring storm track ...

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New supernova analysis reframes dark energy debate

The accelerating expansion of the Universe may not be real, but could just be an apparent effect, according to new research published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The new study — by a group at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand — finds ...

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Coffee and bees: New model of climate change effects

Areas in Latin America suitable for growing coffee face predicted declines of 73-88 percent by 2050. However, diversity in bee species may save the day, even if many species in cool highland regions are lost as the climate warms. The research, co-authored by David Roubik, senior scientist at the Smithsonian ...

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