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The Blockbuster Showdown At Tomorrow’s Berlin Marathon

The three best male marathon runners of their generation, racing on the fastest, flattest course in the world, in a faceoff between Nike and Adidas, with the distinct possibility of a huge new world record: the men’s elite race at tomorrow’s Berlin Marathon has much to recommend it. The likelihood, ...

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Baltimore Built an App to Map Opioid Overdoses in Real Time

The opioid epidemic is ripping through America like a fire untamed. Blame big pharma, if you want. Blame cheap pain pills and cheaper heroin. Blame the mesolimbic reward system. Just don’t wallow in it—the blame. Wallowing takes time, and with opioid abuse killing close to 100 Americans a day, time ...

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After Harvey, What Will Happen to Houston’s Oil Industry?

This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. During this year’s record-breaking hurricane season, oil rigs and refineries were just as exposed as any structure on the precarious Gulf Coast, and their owners were limited to the same options as everyone else: evacuate, prepare, and hope the storm ...

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The United States Needs an Earthquake Warning System Already

On Monday night, residents of the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Westwood, Los Feliz, Silver Lake, and parts of the San Fernando Valley experienced a mild earthquake—a magnitude 3.6. Most people slept through the temblor and no damage was reported. But a select group of 150 LA residents got a text ...

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Emerging disease further jeopardizes North American frogs

A deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. Frogs and salamanders are currently among the most threatened groups of animals on the planet. The two most ...

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How Bizarre Is This Year’s Wildfire Season, Really?

This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The West is burning, and there’s no relief in sight. More than 80 large wildfires are raging in an area covering more than 1.4 million acres, primarily in California, Montana, and Oregon, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. Taken ...

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Why Math Is the Best Way to Make Sense of the World

When Rebecca Goldin spoke to a recent class of incoming freshmen at George Mason University, she relayed a disheartening statistic: According to a recent study, 36 percent of college students don’t significantly improve in critical thinking during their four-year tenure. “These students had trouble distinguishing fact from opinion, and cause ...

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