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84 highly endangered amur leopards remain in China and Russia

Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China. This new estimate of the Amur leopard population was recently reported in the scientific ...

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The Ultimate Carbon-Saving Tip? Travel by Cargo Ship

By the end of June, Kajsa Fernström Nåtby was homesick. The native Swede had just finished a 5-month internship with her country’s diplomatic office near the UN headquarters in Manhattan, darting between debates on migration and ocean plastic. Now, her parents were pleading for her to hop on an 8-hour ...

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What’s a Blazar? A Galactic Bakery for Cosmic Rays

In 1911 and 1912, an Austrian physicist named Victor Hess took to the sky in a series of risky hot air balloon trips—for science. Down on land, researchers had been registering signals of mysterious energetic particles on their instruments. They didn’t know what the signals were or where they came ...

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Snorts indicate positive emotions in horses

New evidence that horses reliably produce more snorts in favorable situations could improve animal welfare practices, according to a study published July 11 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mathilde Stomp of the Université de Rennes, France, and colleagues. Assessing positive emotions is important for improving animal welfare, but ...

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Can Your Electronic Gadgets Interfere With Your Compass?

Does it matter if you put a video camera near your magnetic compass that is used for navigation? The theoretical answer is “yes.” But the practical answer? “Probably not.” Now for a detailed explanation! How does a magnetic compass work? So, the Earth is like a giant magnet, just like ...

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This Galactic Collision Shaped the History of the Milky Way

As the Milky Way was growing, taking shape, and minding its own business around 10 billion years ago, it suffered a massive head-on collision with another, smaller galaxy. That cosmic cataclysm changed the Milky Way’s structure forever, shaping the thick spirals that spin out from the supermassive black hole at ...

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Flattened Fluids Help Scientists Understand Oceans and Atmospheres

Turbulence, the splintering of smooth streams of fluid into chaotic vortices, doesn’t just make for bumpy plane rides. It also throws a wrench into the very mathematics used to describe atmospheres, oceans and plumbing. Turbulence is the reason why the Navier-Stokes equations—the laws that govern fluid flow—are so famously hard ...

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