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SCIENCE

Traffic-related air pollution linked to DNA damage in children

Children and teens exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution have evidence of a specific type of DNA damage called telomere shortening, reports a study in the May Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Young people with asthma also have evidence of telomere shortening, according to the preliminary research ...

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In Defense of the Reality of Time

Physicists and philosophers seem to like nothing more than telling us that everything we thought about the world is wrong. They take a peculiar pleasure in exposing common sense as nonsense. But Tim Maudlin thinks our direct impressions of the world are a better guide to reality than we have ...

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Even If Dana Rohrabacher Was a Russian Asset, Would He Know?

Dana Rohrabacher, a Republican who has represented Huntington Beach, California for 14 terms on Capitol Hill, has a bummer of a nickname: Putin’s Favorite Congressman. On Wednesday, the Washington Post reported that, during a closed meeting of House Republicans, Representative Kevin McCarthy—another Californian and, like Rohrabacher, a stalwart ally of ...

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Storing a memory involves distant parts of the brain

New research from scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus shows that distant parts of the brain are called into action to store a single memory. In studies with mice, the researchers discovered that to maintain certain short-term memories, the brain’s cortex — the outer layer of ...

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Newly discovered brain network offers clues to social cognition

Scientists call our ability to understand another person’s thoughts — to intuit their desires, read their intentions, and predict their behavior — theory of mind. It’s an essential human trait, one that is crucial to effective social interaction. But where did it come from? Working with rhesus macaque monkeys, researchers ...

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Warm-bloodedness possibly much older than previously thought

Warm-bloodedness in land animals could have developed in evolution much earlier than previously thought. This is shown by a recent study at the University of Bonn, which has now been published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol. People who like watching lizards often get the best opportunity to do so ...

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The Best Way To Transmit Satellite Data? In Trucks. Really

An unmarked white semi-truck rests on orange steel plates—Rent Me, they proclaim—protecting the soft ground outside a glass-fronted office building in Westminster, Colorado. Inside the cargo container, locked up in refrigerated drives, is a photo album of Earth. Over 17 years, a company called DigitalGlobe has painstakingly collected those images ...

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3-D-printed, soft, four legged robot can walk on sand and stone

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first soft robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can climb over obstacles and walk on different terrains. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at ...

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